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How To Convert 1 Ton Of Rock To Cubic Yards Of Rock?

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jerome penn Profile
jerome penn answered
If you need a conversion for trade purposes or in order to get an accurate measurement for work, it can be frustrating that there is no definitive equation when transitioning between a ton of rock and its respective quantity in cubic yards. A good example of why this is can be found when you contrast volcanic rock with another alternative such as granite. Have you ever noticed that on a ton by ton basis, you seem to get more volcanic rock than other alternatives? This is all because of the density of this substance, meaning that it is lighter when compared to other geological formations.

A great website to visit when converting between cubic yards and tonnes is www.convert-me.com/en/convert/weight2volume Here, you will be able to select the type of rock that you are looking to measure, and the online converter will use an approximate equation that has been preset to the density of your chosen substance. Do remember that hot and cold temperatures (in addition to other environmental factors) may distort this conversion from being entirely accurate, so do make sure that you include margins of error where required.

Some geology forums and experts in the sector will also be able to provide you with relevant guidance on how to make a spot-on conversion. If you’re planning to sell a significant amount of rock, but your client requires a measurement in cubic yards instead of tonnes, it will be in your interest to get this conversion right. After all, you don’t want to undersell the assets you have, a weakness that may eat into your margins over time.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Will 1 ton of rock cover a 10x10 area
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
1.5 ton
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
If you are going to buy this from a building materials supplier they use the "formula"
Cubic Yards x 1.25 = Weight in tons. They then sell it by the ton. (say $300 per ton)

But this is an approximation. If it is one very big river rock it would be a good approximation, but even then it would depend upon the density of the rock eg granite would require a bigger constant (the 1.25) than a Sandstone boulder. (This is why you would get a lot more volcanic rocks per ton than granite.)
Fred Jones Profile
Fred Jones answered
J nawrocki is reading in the same thing that I was going to bring up. First you must take the density of whatever type of rock you are using. Sand was also once a larger rock but with it's size, a ton of sand would fill much less of a dimension than larger gravel.
John Nawrocki Profile
John Nawrocki answered
Doesn't it depend on the density of the rock? Does a cubic yard of pea-gravel weight the same as a cubic yard of rocks for a wall or pathway?
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
A big variable is the water content in the crushed stone pile that is being loaded.  This is particularly true if it is a rock mix that includes dust or fine particles.  The same is true for wet vs. Dry sand.

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