How Much Salt Do You Use On A Egg Flotation Science Project?

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31 Answers

Neal Widdows Profile
Neal Widdows answered
As eggs-periments go, making it possible so that a fresh egg floats in a glass of water is a well-known scientific test performed by school children across the globe. It is also a phenomenon that fledgling magicians have been taking advantage of for many years; by adding the salt or ‘magic powder’, the terminology of course, dependent on your respective audience, to plain water before or after the egg has been submerged, you will be able to perform this pseudo-miracle with great aplomb. The reason that this experiment works so well, as you’d expect, owes more to the weight of the egg in relation to the water rather than any esoteric incantations or fairy dust used. The density of salt water is simply slightly heavier than the density of an uncooked egg, so in adding salt to normal water, the salt particles increase the weight of the water. A raw egg is only slightly denser than that of plain water so with salt particles added, it makes the water a little heavier than the egg itself which produces the egg’s buoyancy. If using a Baumé scale; invented to measure the density of liquids, by the French pharmacist Antoine Baumé in 1768, a ratio of eight and one-third to nine parts of salt in 100 will be sufficient to create the desired outcome. In layman’s terms though, simply introducing around three or four tablespoons of table salt to approximately one and a half cups of water should be enough to successfully make the egg float. The substitution of sugar in exchange for salt will also enable an egg to float sans-water wings, in a glass of water, but perhaps you’d like to try the experiment for yourself and see how many parts sugar to water it takes to eventually create the same effect?
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Well, the salt makes the water have more density. Density means weight basically. So, without salt, the egg sinks because it is heavy, then WITH the salt, it floats because the water is stronger than the egg!
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Procedure
1. Write your hypothesis on your data
sheet.
2. Fill the container about 2/3 full of water.
3. Carefully drop in the egg. Observe and record.
4. Remove the egg. Add about 2 TEASPOON of
salt. Stir until the salt is dissolved. Keep adding
salt and stirring until no more will dissolve.
5. Carefully drop in the egg. Observe and record.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
It takes 6 teaspoons to float an egg
d ds Profile
d ds answered
There are two principles that are related to this phenomenon, density and Archimedes principle. Density refers to the amount of matter, packed in an object, the egg and water both have densities and this determines whether the object will float or sink. The egg sinks in plain water because in this case the density of the egg is greater than that of the water. When we add salt, the amount of matter packed in the same amount of water increase and hence it becomes dense. If you keep on adding salt a point will come that the density of water exceeds that of the egg and the egg will become relatively lighter and start to float. According to a principle developed by Archimedes, an object placed in water will float when the force exerted by the liquid is greater than the liquid displaced by the object which is called buoyancy. When we add salt to the water it exerts more force of the egg than the water it ahs displaced and it starts to float.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Well I think it will not take that much it just depends on how big the cup is and how many eggs it is.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
A glass of water requires two heaping teaspoons of salt to make an egg float.
thanked the writer.
cassie samuels
cassie samuels commented
I also agree with the person above me two teaspoons of salt can make an egg float
Anonymous
Anonymous commented
No it does not i did the experiment it does not take tht much
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Salt makes an egg float in water by changing the waters density when adding the salt to the water and you will have to stir the salt so it will dissolve.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Because the salt makes the water more dense compared to the density of the egg... Same as with water and oil...
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
It took me 10 teaspoons of regular iodized salt and 9 teaspoons of non iodized sea salt

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