Where Did The American Indians Come From?

11 Answers

Amman Aamir Profile
Amman Aamir answered
The first "Americans" went to America so long ago that we cannot really know as much as we would like to know about their earliest history. But this is what most authorities think happened.

About 12,000 years ago, bands of hunters on foot wandered into a strange new land, following herds of elk and caribou. The land these early hunters came from was probably Siberia. They crossed over to Alaska where the continents of Asia and North America are closest together at the narrow strip of water now called Bering Strait.

For thousands of years more hunters went to North America. They did not all go at once, but went in small family groups. Although they came from the same homeland and were originally alike, they went over a period of thousands of years and thus the groups differed in many ways. They differed in language, in appearance, in customs, in ways of making a living, and in the way they adapted themselves to life in the new land.They all had straight, black hair and high cheekbones. They were all dark-skinned, but their shadings varied. The skins of some had a reddish tinge and so these people were often called "red men".

They used the same sort of weapons and tools, and methods to provide themselves with their food, clothing, and shelter. But they used different materials to satisfy these needs.
The biggest differences that developed among these people were a result of where they settled to live. There were five main living centers where these people settled: the Northwest Coast, the California region, the Southwest, the Eastern Woodlands, and the Plains. The tribes that developed in each of these centers were quite different from each other they were all what came to be known as "Indians".
Steve Theunissen Profile
Prior to the arrival of the Europeans, the Native Americans had a very distinct self identity. It is interesting to note that the name that each tribe gave to itself was basically the same – the people or the human beings. As an example the Narragansett Indians called themselves Ninuog. The Navajo identified themselves as Dine. Both words have been translated as human beings. So when the European pilgrims arrived here, the Indians knew who they were (human beings), but they didn't know who these newcomers were. So they called them Awaunageesuck (Narragansett), or the strangers.

Theories abound as to the origin of the native Americans. In the 19th Century, Mormom leader Joseph Smith was convinced that they were the descendants of the ten lost tribes of Israel. Most anthropologists today, however, believe that the Indians came from Asia on land bridges from Russia to Alaska, or by boat. Modern DNA tests appear to back up this idea.
Jack B Profile
Jack B answered
Native North Americans are the ancestors of nomadic Asians who, while following megafauna of the Pleistocene, quite accidentally found themselves literally at the right place and the right time to cross the Beringian Land Bridge into North America.  Even more specifically, archaeologists have named the specific Asiatics as the "Thule Tradition," who crossed into North America approximately 25,000 years ago.  This corresponds sequentially with some of the earliest artifact remains in the North American interior, dating back 18,000 years ago.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Asia. You can find linguistic and archaeological evidence that proves this fact. DNA testing has been done on both North and South American Continents. DNA Evidence shows that 99.4 % of American Indians tested were in fact from Asia, while 0.6 percent show European & African decent.

Sources:
Trent Stevens, Ph.D. Idaho State University
Simon southerton Ph.D. Molecular biologist
Dr. David Glenn Davis
Trent Stevens, Ph.D. Idaho State University
Simon southerton Ph.D. Molecular biologist

Dr. David Glenn Smith, Ph.D.
Molecular Anthropology at UC, Davis

Dr. Dennis O'Rourke
Molecular Anthropology University of Utah

Dr. Steven L Whittington
Anthropologist, University of Maine
2 years ago

Trent Stevens, Ph.D. Idaho State University
Simon southerton Ph.D. Molecular biologist

Dr. David Glenn Smith, Ph.D.
Molecular Anthropology at UC, Davis

Dr. Dennis O'Rourke
Molecular Anthropology University of Utah

Dr. Steven L Whittington
Anthropologist, University of Maine

Dr Randall Shortridge, Ph.D
Molecular Biologist, University at Buffalo (NY)

Dr Thomas Murphy Ph.D.
Glen Thornbury Profile
Glen Thornbury answered
The latest studies say the Cloves were here in 1900 BC not AD. That was on a Nova special on National Public TV! And they said it was expected to go back farther!
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Its simple from asia....
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
If you want to find the TRUE answer to this question "where do American Indians come from?" read ''The Book of Mormon'' all the answers are in there, if you are ready for them :)

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