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How Do You Work Out The Square Root Of A Number?

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Anonymous answered
I'm doing a patio and I want til know hom till make it square?
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Anonymous answered
Calculating square root of a number is like performing a long handed division. Square root of a number is worked out by setting up a division with the number that is under the radical (\/ 6,65,64.). Mark off pairs of the digits starting from the decimal. The decimal point and a comma mark pairs of digits. Take the leftmost digit and find whose square is less or equal to it. Once you've found the number write it above and subtract the square of this number from the original number. For example in the number 6,65,64., 4 is the square root of 2. So 2 is written above the 6,65,64 number and 4 is subtracted from the same. Bring the next two digits down (65). Next we need to check if there is a large number that can be put in the units and be multiplied times the divisor, would still be less than or equal to the number we have. In the example 5 will work since 6*40 is equals to 240 which is greater than 265. Bringing down the next two digits you will need to double the number that is at the top. This time number 8 would work. So the square root for 6,65, 64 comes out to be 258.
thanked the writer.
Philip Kraker
Philip Kraker commented
What in God's name are you talking about. Are you an American? I am a CPA and I don't understand your numbering system. We use the 10 base system where you use commas after 3 numbers, not two. So 66564 = 66,564. What did you mean?
Anonymous
Anonymous commented
Leader is using commas to separate the number into pairs of digits, not as separators to mark every three decades. It's really quite clever, if you understand the process. And yes, in some countries they have different conventions for using commas in numbers.

America didn't invent our numbering system, nor did a God. We currently use Arabic numerals derived from Hindi characters established in India, that were adopted by Europe during the age of Islamic trading. If it wasn't for this legacy, you would probably be doing your accounting with Roman numerals.

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