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How To Write A Narrative Report Of Hotel And Restaurant Management?

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Connor Sephton Profile
Connor Sephton answered
All you need to remember that a narrative report has to tell a story and therefore you should have a plot idea about what you are going to write about. As long as you know where the narrative report is going to start and where it is going to end you can be sure that you will be able to write it successfully without there being any problems. You will need to ensure that you include as much descriptive detail as possible to make the report as interested as possible for the reader so they are not going to get bored.

Also, if you can make sure that you use both formal and informal language, the reader is going to feel as comfortable as possible so they are not going to be overwhelmed by the narrative report and they are not going to feel like it is too informal to be a report. You will find that when you begin to write the report that it will come naturally, telling a story is something that we all learn to do learn on in life and you are simply telling a story in the report.

It is up to you how professional you wan to keep the report or how informal you want to have it, it is all going to depend on the audience that is going to be reading the report and what you want them to think about it. As hotel and restaurant management isn't the most fun subject that someone has ever written about you can make it fun and informal in places to make it seem more interesting.

This is also going to make the reader more passionate and interested in what you have to say. If you do have any problems you will just need to ensure that you stick your plot idea as this is going to help you to carry the narrative report to the end.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
He purpose of a narrative report is to describe something. Many students write narrative reports thinking that these are college essays or papers. While the information in these reports is basic to other forms of writing, narrative reports lack the "higher order thinking" that essays require. Thus narrative reports do not, as a rule, yield high grades for many college courses. A basic example of a narrative report is a "book report" that outlines a book; it includes the characters, their actions, possibly the plot, and, perhaps, some scenes. That is, it is a description of "what happens in the book." But this leaves out an awful lot.
What is left out is what the book or article is about -- the underlying concepts, assumptions, arguments, or point of view that the book or article expresses. A narrative report leaves aside a discussion that puts the events of the text into the context of what the text is about. Is the text about love? Life in the fast lane? Society? Wealth and power? Poverty? In other words, narrative reports often overlook the authors purpose or point of view expressed through the book or article.
Once an incident is chosen, the writer should keep three principles in mind.
Remember to involve readers in the story. It is much more interesting to actually recreate an incident for readers than to simply tell about it.
Find a generalization, which the story supports. This is the only way the writer's personal experience will take on meaning for readers. This generalization does not have to encompass humanity as a whole; it can concern the writer, men, women, or children of various ages and backgrounds.
Remember that although the main component of a narrative is the story, details must be carefully selected to support, explain, and enhance the story.

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